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Matthew Lee
Matthew Lee

Mature Women Hole



The fleshy area located just above the top of the vaginal opening is called the mons pubis. Two pairs of skin flaps called the labia (which means lips) surround the vaginal opening. The clitoris, a small sensory organ, is located toward the front of the vulva where the folds of the labia join. Between the labia are openings to the urethra (the canal that carries pee from the bladder to the outside of the body) and vagina. When girls become sexually mature, the outer labia and the mons pubis are covered by pubic hair.




mature women hole



A very thin piece of skin-like tissue called the hymen partly covers the opening of the vagina. Hymens are often different from female to female. Most women find their hymens have stretched or torn after their first sexual experience, and the hymen may bleed a little (this usually causes little, if any, pain). Some women who have had sex don't have much of a change in their hymens, though. And some women's hymens have already stretched even before they have sex.


When a baby girl is born, her ovaries contain hundreds of thousands of eggs, which stay inactive until puberty begins. At puberty, the document.write(def_pituitarygland_T); pituitary gland (in the central part of the brain) starts making hormones that stimulate the ovaries to make female sex hormones, including estrogen. The secretion of these hormones causes a girl to develop into a sexually mature woman.


It's common for women and girls to have some discomfort in the days leading to their periods. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) includes both physical and emotional symptoms that many girls and women get right before their periods, such as:


The girl arrived at the hospital with an empty stomach -- and therefore with little stomach acid around -- and doctors found two holes from a stab wound that opened her stomach up to her abdominal cavity. The case report said doctors washed her stomach out with a salt solution and stitched her up.


The hormonal changes that occur as a woman ages and goes through menopause can lead to atrophy of the vaginal wall (thinning) and affect the delicate pH balance of the vagina, as it stops making as much good bacteria, which fights off the bad bacteria. When the ecosystem of the vagina is altered, it leaves women more prone to vaginal infections like bacterial vaginosis.


Many women suffering from the above symptoms can benefit from Hormone Replacement Therapy, also known as HRT. A simple and effective treatment which uses estrogen and progesterone, HRT can provide very effective relief from the symptoms of menopause.


Certain medicines that the mother takes can pass into the bloodstream of the baby and interfere with organ development. One medicine known to do this is diethylstilbestrol (DES). Health care providers once prescribed this medicine to pregnant women to prevent miscarriage and early labor. However, scientists learned that baby girls born to women who took this medicine had an abnormally shaped uterus. The drug also increased the daughters' chances of developing a rare form of vaginal cancer.


Gastroschisis occurs early during pregnancy. The hole is usually to the right side of the belly button. Because the intestines are not covered in a protective sac and are exposed to the amniotic fluid, they can become irritated, causing them to shorten, twist, or swell.


Bones feel solid, but the inside of a bone is actually filled with holes like a honeycomb. Bone tissues are broken down and rebuilt all the time. While some cells build new bone tissue, others dissolve bone and release the minerals inside.


Experts suggest that women start getting screened for osteoporosis at age 65. Women younger than age 65 who are at high risk for fractures should also be screened. Men should discuss screening recommendations with their health care providers.


Vaginal thrush can affect women of any age, although it is more common in women between the ages of 15 and 50 years old. It is unusual in girls who have not yet begun their periods and in older women after menopause.


In most cases, treatment will relieve the symptoms. However, some women may have thrush that keeps coming back, and others seem to get it almost continually. In these instances, doctors may prescribe longer courses of treatment.


Accidentally swallowing or breathing in pinworm eggs causes a pinworm infection. The tiny (microscopic) eggs can be carried to your mouth by contaminated food, drink or your fingers. Once swallowed, the eggs hatch in the intestines and mature into adult worms within a few weeks.


A hole in the heart can lead to the mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. This may put stress on the side of the heart that is getting more blood flow than expected, which may cause a condition called cyanosis. Cyanosis refers to skin discoloration resulting from circulation issues of oxygenated blood.


A small or minor ventricular or atrial septal abnormality may not put excess strain on the heart and lungs, and a heart murmur may be the only detectable sign. However, a large hole may cause symptoms.


Large holes or holes causing symptoms may require surgery. In infants, surgeons may place a temporary patch before performing a more invasive heart surgery when the child becomes older. More invasive surgery may occur if the infant has serious symptoms.


In some cases, surgeons can close the hole without a patch. For large holes, they may use a device to block the hole. For PFO, treatment usually involves closure with an amplatzer device, a mesh implant.


Urinary incontinence is leaking of urine that you can't control. Many American men and women suffer from urinary incontinence. We don't know for sure exactly how many. That's because many people do not tell anyone about their symptoms. They may be embarrassed, or they may think nothing can be done. So they suffer in silence.


A quarter to a third of men and women in the U.S. suffer from urinary incontinence. That means millions of Americans. About 33 million have overactive bladder (also known as OAB) representing symptoms of urgency, frequency and with or without urge incontinence.


Studies show that many things increase risk. For example, aging is linked to urinary incontinence. Pregnancy, delivery, and number of children increase the risk in women. Women who have had a baby have higher rates of urinary incontinence. The risk increases with the number of children. This is true for cesarean section (c-section) and vaginal delivery.


Urinary incontinence is not a disease. It is a symptom of many conditions. Causes may differ for men and women. But it is not hereditary. And it is not just a normal part of aging. These are the four types of urinary incontinence:


OAB is another common type of urinary incontinence. It is also called "urgency" incontinence. OAB affects more than 30% of men and 40% of women in the U.S. It affects people's lives. They may restrict activities. They may fear they will suddenly have to urinate when they aren't near a bathroom. They may not even be able to get a good night's sleep. Some people have both SUI and OAB and this is known as mixed incontinence.


OAB is more likely in men with prostate problems and in women after menopause. It is caused by many things. Even diet can affect OAB. There are a number of treatments. They include life style changes, drugs that relax the bladder muscle, or surgery. Some people have both SUI and OAB.


Frequent small urinations and constant dribbling are the main symptoms of overflow incontinence. The bladder is unable to empty. Symptoms happen when the bladder is full. This type is less often in women however, dropped bladders, prior bladder surgeries or diabetes may affect this. It is more common in men with a history of prostate problems or surgery.


A Foley catheter should only be used for less than 2 years. If you need an indwelling catheter for a longer period of time, you should consider a suprapubic catheter. Because the suprapubic catheter is only in the bladder, there is less risk of bacteria growing (because it is away from the vagina and rectum). That means less risk of urinary tract infections, especially in women.


For men, there are external collecting systems called condom or Texas catheters. These special condoms are rolled over the penis. They are kept in place by adhesive or straps. The condoms have holes at the tip. A tube goes from the hole to a drainage bag. Urine from incontinence collects in the drainage bag. Newer condoms are usually silicone. They come in sizes, with a sizing guide.


An external collection device for women funnels urine from a pouch through a tube to a collecting device. These must be stuck to the outside of the labia. They are rarely used as the labia do not form a good water tight seal, so urine leaks.


Older men and women can perform CIC and should be on a routine schedule. The amount of urine in the bladder should be 15 ounces or less. Catheterization may be needed four to five times a day. Most healthcare insurances and Medicare will pay for 4 catheters a day (120 a month).


Most IC catheters are straight. Some (called Coudé catheters) have a curved tip. It may be easier for a man to advance a curved tip past the prostate gland. Catheter lengths are 6 inches for women and 12 inches for men.


Urinals (plastic jug-type devices) are useful if you cannot move easily. You urinate into these devices directly. They can help when restrooms are not accessible. They are also useful when traveling. And they are an option if you are confined to a bed or chair. Most urinals, such as the newer spill proof ones, are easier for men to use. Urinals for women are not as easy to use. 041b061a72


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